A Home of Brick and Tin, Cannock Chase AONB

 

The project was conceived as a way of releasing the potential for transforming living in traditional British houses. Originally a 2 up 2 down semi-detached farm workers house dating from the mid-18th century, the characterful but poor performing solid brick walls and single glazing with traditional roof construction was a challenge to bring up to today’s standards of thermal performance and energy efficiency. The house sits on a constrained site, narrow and tight against a country roadway but widening to the rear of the house, revealing a ½ acre garden. The design strategy looked to enhance the performance of the building towards passive house standards and re-orient the house to fully address the garden. To achieve this a new hearth forms the heart of the home, which provides the focal point to the lounge, this is connected to the original cottage by a linked dining space. A new courtyard becomes the main entrance to the house, these external and internal spaces wrapping around one another. To further differentiate old from new, the new structure is set into the ground allowing internal heights to be significantly increased, enhancing the internal feeling of space and openness, whilst the original house areas retain their 2m high ceilings, preserving the cosy, cottage feeling. The entire building has been wrapped with high performance insulation with a thickness set to achieve passive house standards, the roof and floors have been insulated to the same standard, finished with high performance composite windows, and wrapped with sustainable black metal cladding and a de-saturated grey brick. What was a cold, damp, draughty cottage is now a home fit for the 21st century.

 

© 2023 Egon Hansen Architects. All Rights Reserved.

© 2023 Egon Hansen Architects. All Rights Reserved.

© 2023 Egon Hansen Architects. All Rights Reserved.

A Home of Brick and Tin, Cannock Chase AONB

 

The project was conceived as a way of releasing the potential for transforming living in traditional British houses. Originally a 2 up 2 down semi-detached farm workers house dating from the mid-18th century, the characterful but poor performing solid brick walls and single glazing with traditional roof construction was a challenge to bring up to today’s standards of thermal performance and energy efficiency. The house sits on a constrained site, narrow and tight against a country roadway but widening to the rear of the house, revealing a ½ acre garden. The design strategy looked to enhance the performance of the building towards passive house standards and re-orient the house to fully address the garden. To achieve this a new hearth forms the heart of the home, which provides the focal point to the lounge, this is connected to the original cottage by a linked dining space. A new courtyard becomes the main entrance to the house, these external and internal spaces wrapping around one another. To further differentiate old from new, the new structure is set into the ground allowing internal heights to be significantly increased, enhancing the internal feeling of space and openness, whilst the original house areas retain their 2m high ceilings, preserving the cosy, cottage feeling. The entire building has been wrapped with high performance insulation with a thickness set to achieve passive house standards, the roof and floors have been insulated to the same standard, finished with high performance composite windows, and wrapped with sustainable black metal cladding and a de-saturated grey brick. What was a cold, damp, draughty cottage is now a home fit for the 21st century.